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SCIENCE

Bird feared extinct rediscovered in the Bahamas

One of the rarest birds in the western hemisphere, the Bahama Nuthatch, has been rediscovered by research teams searching the island of Grand Bahama. The finding is particularly significant because the species had been feared extinct following the catastrophic damage caused by Hurricane Matthew in 2016, and had not been ... Read More »

If the birds can expect a larger profit in the future, they foregoe their desire for immediate reward

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft. “If the birds can expect a larger profit in the future, they foregoe their desire for immediate reward.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 August 2018. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180822141018.htm>. Max-Planck-Gesellschaft. (2018, August 22). If the birds can expect a larger profit in the future, they foregoe their desire for immediate reward. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August ... Read More »

Getting to the root of plant evolution

Despite plants and vegetation being key to the Earth’s ecosystem, little is known about the origin of their roots. However in new research, published in Nature, Oxford University scientists describe a transitional root fossils from the earliest land ecosystem that sheds light on how roots have evolved. The findings suggest ... Read More »

The spotlight of attention is more like a strobe light

You don’t focus as well as you think you do. That’s the fundamental finding of a team of researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-Berkeley who studied monkeys and humans and discovered that attention pulses in and out four times per second. “Our subjective experience of the visual ... Read More »

Newly identified structure in lymph nodes was ‘hiding in plain sight’

For the first time in decades, researchers have identified a new ‘micro-organ’ within the immune system — and they say it’s an important step towards understanding how to make better vaccines. In a study published this week in Nature Communications, scientists at Australia’s Garvan Institute of Medical Research have identified ... Read More »

Specially prepared paper can bend, fold or flatten on command

One of the oldest, most versatile and inexpensive of materials — paper — seemingly springs to life, bending, folding or flattening itself, by means of a low-cost actuation technology developed at Carnegie Mellon University’s Human-Computer Interaction Institute. A thin layer of conducting thermoplastic, applied to common paper with an inexpensive ... Read More »

Candidate for universal flu vaccine protects against multiple strains

A universal flu vaccine that protects people against most influenza strains is one step closer to reality, with a study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The candidate vaccine, described in Nature Communications this week, elicited a strong antibody response to a structure on the ... Read More »

A switch to turn fragrances on and off

Salk Institute and Purdue University scientists have discovered the switch in plants that turns off production of terpenoids — carbon-rich compounds that play roles in plant physiology and are used by humans in everything from fragrances and flavorings to biofuels and pharmaceuticals. Plant terpenoids are found in nutritional supplements, natural ... Read More »

Orphaned elephants have a tougher social life

Young female orphan elephants have a tougher social life than non-orphans, a new study suggests, adding to a growing body of evidence of how the impacts of poaching cascade through elephant societies. The research, part of a wider study by Save The Elephants and Colorado State University into the social ... Read More »

Wireless communication breaks through water-air barrier

MIT researchers have taken a step toward solving a longstanding challenge with wireless communication: direct data transmission between underwater and airborne devices. Today, underwater sensors cannot share data with those on land, as both use different wireless signals that only work in their respective mediums. Radio signals that travel through ... Read More »

Annual pap test a ‘thing of the past?’

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has released new recommendations on screening for cervical cancer. These latest recommendations continue the trend of decreasing participant burden by lengthening screening intervals, making the “annual Pap” a historical artifact. Since its introduction 75 years ago, exfoliative cytology commonly known as the ... Read More »

Less drain on freshwater supplies with seawater fuel discovery

Researchers have found that seawater can replace freshwater to produce the sustainable fuel Bioethanol, reducing the need to drain precious resources. The study — ‘The establishment of a marine focused biorefinery for bioethanol production using seawater and a novel marine yeast strain’ — has been published in Scientific Reports and ... Read More »

Talking to an android: Meet ERICA, she wants to listen to you

We’ve all tried talking with devices, and in some cases they talk back. But, it’s a far cry from having a conversation with a real person. Now a research team from Kyoto University, Osaka University, and the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute, or ATR, have significantly upgraded the interaction system for ... Read More »

New genetic regulators of regeneration identified

Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory and the University of Maine have discovered that genetic material in the cell that was previously thought to be “junk” because of its apparent lack of function likely plays a part in regulating genetic circuits responsible for regeneration in highly regenerative animals. Viravuth P. ... Read More »