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SCIENCE

Mutations in this molecule may have helped mammoths tolerate the cold

Columbia University biomedical researchers have captured close-up views of TRPV3, a skin-cell ion channel that plays important roles in sensing temperature, itch, and pain. In humans, defects in the protein can lead to skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema), vitiligo (uneven skin coloration), skin cancer, and ... Read More »

No safe level of alcohol, new study concludes

A new scientific study concludes there is no safe level of drinking alcohol. The study, published today in the international medical journal The Lancet, shows that in 2016, nearly 3 million deaths globally were attributed to alcohol use, including 12 percent of deaths in males between the ages of 15 ... Read More »

Sweeter dreams in a peaceful mind

It has long been assumed that the content of dreams can tell us something about the person’s well-being. However, so far dream researchers have mostly studied the dreams of people suffering from various disorders and we know very little about the positive side of well-being: do happier people have happier ... Read More »

Tracking the evolution and transmission of yellow fever

A pioneering Oxford University research collaboration into yellow fever virus (YFV) has shed new light on the exceptional recent outbreak in Brazil and how the virus spreads. The findings have implications for monitoring viral transmission and could potentially contribute to a strategy for eliminating YFV worldwide. Published in Science, the ... Read More »

Evidence of matter-matter coupling

After their recent pioneering experiments to couple light and matter to an extreme degree, Rice University scientists decided to look for a similar effect in matter alone. They didn’t expect to find it so soon. Rice physicist Junichiro Kono, graduate student Xinwei Li and their international colleagues have discovered the ... Read More »

Novel process to 3-D print interconnected layers of 2-D graphene

Researchers from Virginia Tech and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed a novel way to 3D print complex objects of one of the highest-performing materials used in the battery and aerospace industries. Previously, researchers could only print this material, known as graphene, in 2D sheets or basic structures. But Virginia ... Read More »

How sleep loss may contribute to adverse weight gain

In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University now demonstrate that one night of sleep loss has a tissue-specific impact on the regulation of gene expression and metabolism in humans. This may explain how shift work and chronic sleep loss impairs our metabolism and adversely affects our body composition. The ... Read More »

Bird feared extinct rediscovered in the Bahamas

One of the rarest birds in the western hemisphere, the Bahama Nuthatch, has been rediscovered by research teams searching the island of Grand Bahama. The finding is particularly significant because the species had been feared extinct following the catastrophic damage caused by Hurricane Matthew in 2016, and had not been ... Read More »

If the birds can expect a larger profit in the future, they foregoe their desire for immediate reward

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft. “If the birds can expect a larger profit in the future, they foregoe their desire for immediate reward.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 August 2018. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180822141018.htm>. Max-Planck-Gesellschaft. (2018, August 22). If the birds can expect a larger profit in the future, they foregoe their desire for immediate reward. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August ... Read More »

Getting to the root of plant evolution

Despite plants and vegetation being key to the Earth’s ecosystem, little is known about the origin of their roots. However in new research, published in Nature, Oxford University scientists describe a transitional root fossils from the earliest land ecosystem that sheds light on how roots have evolved. The findings suggest ... Read More »

The spotlight of attention is more like a strobe light

You don’t focus as well as you think you do. That’s the fundamental finding of a team of researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-Berkeley who studied monkeys and humans and discovered that attention pulses in and out four times per second. “Our subjective experience of the visual ... Read More »

Newly identified structure in lymph nodes was ‘hiding in plain sight’

For the first time in decades, researchers have identified a new ‘micro-organ’ within the immune system — and they say it’s an important step towards understanding how to make better vaccines. In a study published this week in Nature Communications, scientists at Australia’s Garvan Institute of Medical Research have identified ... Read More »

Specially prepared paper can bend, fold or flatten on command

One of the oldest, most versatile and inexpensive of materials — paper — seemingly springs to life, bending, folding or flattening itself, by means of a low-cost actuation technology developed at Carnegie Mellon University’s Human-Computer Interaction Institute. A thin layer of conducting thermoplastic, applied to common paper with an inexpensive ... Read More »

Candidate for universal flu vaccine protects against multiple strains

A universal flu vaccine that protects people against most influenza strains is one step closer to reality, with a study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The candidate vaccine, described in Nature Communications this week, elicited a strong antibody response to a structure on the ... Read More »