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Vivimed Labs’ API manufacturing facility gets EIR from USFDA

Vivimed Labs’ API manufacturing facility located in Cuernavaca, Mexico has been inspected by the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). The inspection was successful and company obtained Establishment Inspection Report (EIR). This was a routine inspection by the USFDA. Vivimed Labs is engaged in providing specialty chemicals and pharmaceuticals products. ... Read More »

Neglected baby beetles evolve greater self-reliance

In gardens, parks and woods across the UK, the Sexton burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides quietly buries dead mice and other small vertebrates to create edible nests for their young. Most parents remove the animal’s hair and slash the flesh of the carcass to help their newly-hatched larvae crawl inside. Typically ... Read More »

A naturally occurring antibiotic active against drug-resistant tuberculosis

A naturally occurring antibiotic called kanglemycin A is effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, even in drug-resistant strains, according to an international team of researchers who used chemistry, molecular biology, microbiology, and X-ray crystallography to show how the compound maintains its activity. A paper describing the research ... Read More »

Preventing a dengue outbreak at the 2020 Summer Olympics

In 2014, a dengue outbreak unexpectedly occurred in Tokyo. What does that mean for the 2020 summer Olympics and Paralympics being held in the city? Researchers report this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases that new controls and frameworks are recommended to detect dengue and other infectious diseases and help ... Read More »

Smart pills dumb down medical care, experts warn

Enthusiasm for an emerging digital health tool, the smart pill, is on the rise but researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have published a paper in the American Journal of Bioethics that cautions health care providers and policymakers to slow down when it comes to allowing this technology ... Read More »

TINY cancer detection device proves effective in Uganda testing

Its name is an acronym used to convey its size, but researchers at Cornell Engineering and Weill Cornell Medicine are hoping their hand-held cancer detection device’s impact in the developing world is anything but small. About half the size of a lunch box, the Tiny Isothermal Nucleic acid quantification sYstem ... Read More »

Neutrons produce first direct 3-D maps of water during cell membrane fusion

New 3D maps of water distribution during cellular membrane fusion are accelerating scientific understanding of cell development, which could lead to new treatments for diseases associated with cell fusion. Using neutron diffraction at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, researchers have made the first direct observations of water ... Read More »

Even the best healthcare facilities can do more to prevent infections

Healthcare-associated infections can be reduced by up to 55 percent by systematically implementing evidence-based infection prevention and control strategies, according to a review of 144 studies published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). The study suggests that there ... Read More »

Can video game exercises help chronic low back pain?

New research from University of Sydney has found home-based video-game exercises can reduce chronic low back pain in older people by 27 percent, which is comparable to benefits gained under programs supervised by a physiotherapist. Published today in Physical Therapy journal, this first-of-its-kind study investigated the effectiveness of self-managed home-based ... Read More »

Drug overdose epidemic has been growing exponentially for decades

Death rates from drug overdoses in the U.S. have been on an exponential growth curve that began at least 15 years before the mid-1990s surge in opioid prescribing, suggesting that overdose death rates may continue along this same historical growth trajectory for years to come, according to a University of ... Read More »