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Author Archives: chundawat

Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator

Water covers most of the globe, yet many regions still suffer from a lack of clean drinking water. If scientists could efficiently and sustainably turn seawater into clean water, a looming global water crisis might be averted. Now, inspired by origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, researchers have devised ... Read More »

Mineral weathering from thawing permafrost can release substantial CO2

The amount of carbon dioxide released from thawing permafrost might be greater than previously thought, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists. The research is the first to document the potential for substantial contributions of CO2 from thawing permafrost to the atmosphere through an inorganic process called ... Read More »

Zombie cells found in brains of mice prior to cognitive loss

Zombie cells are the ones that can’t die but are equally unable to perform the functions of a normal cell. These zombie, or senescent, cells are implicated in a number of age-related diseases. And with a new letter in Nature, Mayo Clinic researchers have expanded that list. In a mouse ... Read More »

Diverse forests are stronger against drought

Diversity is strength, even among forests. In a paper published in Nature, researchers led by University of Utah biologist William Anderegg report that forests with trees that employ a high diversity of traits related to water use suffer less of an impact from drought. The results, which expand on previous ... Read More »

New nanoparticle superstructures made from pyramid-shaped building blocks

Researchers from Brown University have assembled complex macroscale superstructures from pyramid-shaped nanoparticle building blocks. The research, described in the journal Nature, demonstrates a promising new way to bring the useful properties of nanoparticles to macroscale materials and devices. “There’s been a lot of research in making superstructures from spherical nanoparticles, ... Read More »

Light provides spin

Physicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have proven that incoming light causes the electrons in warm perovskites to rotate thus influencing the direction of the flow of electrical current. They have thus found the key to an important characteristic of these crystals, which could play an important role in the development ... Read More »

Plant growth-promoting bacteria enhance plant salinity tolerance

Soil salinity is one of the key abiotic stress factor affecting agricultural productivity worldwide. Every day, nearly 2000 hectares of fertile agricultural land degrades due to salinity. There are only limited agricultural options to cope with increasing salinification of soils, especially in the case of salt sensitive staple crops such ... Read More »

Medical News Today: What are the stages of Crohn’s disease?

Crohn’s disease is a long-term condition that causes inflammation in the digestive tract. Doctors do not categorize Crohn’s into different stages because symptoms can vary considerably over time, which can make it unpredictable. Crohn’s disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease. It is a progressive condition, which means that ... Read More »

How long does a quantum jump take?

Quantum jumps are usually regarded to be instantaneous. However, new measurement methods are so precise that it has now become possible to observe such a process and to measure its duration precisely — for example the famous ‘photoelectric effect’, first described by Albert Einstein. It was one of the crucial ... Read More »

Moderate warming could melt East Antarctic Ice Sheet

Parts of the world’s largest ice sheet would melt if Antarctic warming of just 2°C is sustained for millennia, according to international research. University of Queensland scientist Dr Kevin Welsh was part of a team that used evidence from warm periods in Earth’s history to see how the East Antarctic ... Read More »

When a chemical tag makes the difference in cell fate and gene expression

Scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, Spain, have uncovered the role of special chemical ‘tags’ in controlling vital genes involved in early mammalian development, publishing their findings in the journal Nature Genetics on 17th September. Their work, which studied the changes in epigenetics, genome architecture, accessibility and ... Read More »

Medical News Today: Fifteen healthful high-carb foods

Carbohydrates are an essential component of the diet, and many high-carb foods offer excellent health benefits. There has been a lot of negativity surrounding carbs in recent decades. However, they are one of the main nutrients that the body needs, along with protein and fats. Carbs are essential not only ... Read More »

New insight into aging

They say you can’t teach old dogs new tricks, but new research shows you can teach an old rat new sounds, even if the lesson doesn’t stick very long. Researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) of McGill University examined the effects of aging on neuroplasticity in ... Read More »

The best managed web hosting of 2018

You've designed a great website, found a quality hosting package and got your creation online. That's great, but don't relax just yet; there's plenty more to do. Maintaining your website involves a lot of work. You'll need to monitor it to make sure it's online and working normally.  Web apps ... Read More »

VPN is harming the future of content producers and this will end

VPNs have been around almost as long as the internet itself. From the earliest of days, the desire for security within the enterprise market created a market within enterprise solutions for end-to-end connections on the internet that went through their own encrypted tunnel; rather than the open internet. This “Virtual ... Read More »